July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (2024)

Table of Contents
What we know so far Vice President Harris visits Highland Park shooting scene: "We're here for you and westand with you" Illinois State Police granted firearm card after getting report from local police on shooting suspect Grandsons describe shooting victim Stephen Straus as full of life: "He was not ready to go by any means" Parents of 2-year-old boy among those killed in Highland Park shooting Shooting suspect attended an April service at a local synagogue, congregation official says Lake County state's attorney: "All of the people who died, steps from here, lost their freedom" Shooting suspect charged with 7 counts of first-degree murder In speech just miles from Highland Park, Harris makes full-throated call for assault weapons ban NOW: Officials hold news conference on Highland Park shooting Former classmates describe Highland Park shooting suspect as withdrawn and odd They dove on top of their grandkids to shield them during Highland Park mass shooting Law enforcement received two previous reports in 2019 about shooting suspect, police say Investigators are seeking witness they believe saw suspect drop his gun after mass shooting, police say Here are the names of the victims who were killed in the Highland Park mass shooting State attorney expected to announce charges against suspect this evening, official says Grandmother who attended Highland Park parade says she wants action, not prayers following deadly shooting Death toll rises to 7 in Highland Park mass shooting Highland Park resident says city's gun safety laws drew her there. Years later, she was caught in gunfire Illinois leaders discuss bipartisan bill to address gun safety after Highland Park shooting 39 people from Highland Park parade shooting treated at area hospitals Woman injured in Highland Park shooting stampede: "It’ll be a long healing process" In the wake of parade mass shooting, McConnell touts bipartisan gun law Doctor waiting for family at parade describes treating gunshot victim moments after shooting began Residents say they'd seen the suspect in the area and recognized him from his face tattoos and colorful hair FBI inspecting parade area where people hastily left belongings as they ran for safety Here's what we know so far about what happened during the parade shooting that killed 6 people Family describes Highland Park shooting victim Nicolas Toledo as "creative, adventurous and funny" YouTube and Spotify remove content tied to Highland Park shooting suspect Biden orders flags to half-staff to honor Highland Park victims Suspect was wearing women's clothing to blend into the crowd after shooting, police say Here's how the Highland Park shooting suspect was caught, according to authorities Police have not determined a motive yet for Highland Park shooting, according to deputy chief Investigators are not ready to announce charges against suspect yet, police say Parade shooting suspect planned attack over several weeks, police say Parade shooting suspect acted alone, police say Shooting suspect fired more than 70 rounds into the crowd, authorities say Police chief of suspected parade shooter's hometown says they had no prior crime-related interactions with him Biden says he's "not sure yet" if he will travel to Highland Park Police say the Highland Park shooting was both "random" and "intentional." A CNN analyst explains. Parade witness says son asked if a shooter will be at every July 4 parade This Highland Park resident directed children and others looking for shelter into a synagogue Highland Park mayor says she expects suspected shooter to be charged Tuesday Parade shooting suspect legally obtained the weapon used, Highland Park mayor says Doctor who treated victims at parade shooting says the dead had "wartime injuries" Witness describes hiding son in dumpster as shots rang out at parade Former preschool teacher identified as a victim of July Fourth parade shooting It's 5 a.m. in Highland Park. Here are the latest developments "It was right on top of us": Witness describes horror of parade-goers ducking for cover from gunfire Chicago sports teams express support, sympathy for Highland Park 13-year-old had active shooter training and "hit the ground sobbing," relative says Sounds of gunfire were originally thought to be fireworks, some bystanders said Victims transported to an area hospital ranged in age from 8 to 85, doctor says Bidens "shocked" by Highland Park shooting as White House marks July Fourth Here's what we know about the suspect taken into custody in connection with the shooting Analysis: July 4 parade slaughter again shows nowhere is safe from America's mass killing contagion Gun Violence Archive: Over the past 186 days, there have been more than 300 mass shootings in the US Here are the latest developments in the Illinois Fourth of July parade shooting 6 people were killed in a mass shooting at a Fourth of July parade in Illinois. Here's what we know Shooting suspect posted violent imagery "It was sickening": Highland Park residents describe scene at parade Illinois senator touts new gun legislation, says more needs to be done Read More Read More References

By Travis Caldwell, Kelly McCleary, Aditi Sangal, Adrienne Vogt, Maureen Chowdhury, Elise Hammond and Melissa Macaya, CNN

Updated 9:11 PM EDT, Tue July 5, 2022

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (4)

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Police reveal past incidents with suspected Highland Park gunman

02:57 - Source: CNN

What we know so far

  • The Highland Park, Illinois, mass shooting suspect has been charged with seven counts of first-degree murder after at least seven people were killed and dozens were injured at a July 4th parade on Monday.
  • Police say the suspect used a “high-powered rifle” in the attack and may have planned the shooting “for several weeks.” Authorities interacted with the suspect twice in 2019, and in one case, multiple knives were removed from his home.
  • Witnesses described frantically fleeing the parade when they realized they heard gunshots, not fireworks. Highland Park is located about 25 miles north of Chicago.

62 Posts

Follow the latest news on the Illinois Fourth of July parade shooting here and read more about today’s developments in the posts below.

Vice President Harris visits Highland Park shooting scene: "We're here for you and westand with you"

From CNN staff
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (5)

Vice President Kamala Harris speaks near the site of Monday's mass shooting.

Vice President Kamala Harris visited the scene of the Highland Park, Illinois, mass shooting on Tuesday evening, expressing in remarks to reporters her support for the community and urging the country to “stand together andspeak out” about why gun violence has to stop.

“There’s a lot of healing that’s gonna have tohappen, that is both physical and emotional. There is no question that thisexperience is something thatis gonna linger in terms ofthe trauma.And so I’d like to urge all thefamilies and all the individuals todo —seek the support that you sorightly to serve,” Harris continued.

Harris also used a portion of her remarks to address gun safety in the United States.

“We’ve got to besmarter as a country, in termsof who has access to what, andin particular, assault weapons.And we’ve got to take this stuffseriously, as seriously as youare, because you have beenforced to have to take this seriously,” she said.

Harris was accompanied on her visit by Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering, Rep. Brad Schneider, a Democrat who represents the 10th District in Illinois, and state Sen. Julie Morrison, according to the press pool traveling with her Tuesday.

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (6)

More on the vice president’s Illinois visit: During a call Tuesday morning, Rotering invited the vice president to join her in Highland Park following Harris’ speech to the National Education Association.

Harris delivered remarks earlier on Tuesday in Chicago, just miles from Highland Park, and pointedly told Congress to “have the courage” to act on an assault weapons ban and to “stop protecting” gun manufacturers.

“Yesterday, it should have been a day to come together with family and friends to celebrate our nation’s independence and instead, that community suffered a violent tragedy,” Harris said in remarks to the National Education Association on Tuesday.

“We need to stop this violence,” she said.

“You know, I’ve said it before. Enough is enough,” she said forcefully. “I mean, here we are, our nation is still mourning the loss of those 19 babies and their two teachers in Uvalde.”

CNN’s Mary Kay Mallonee contributed reporting to this post.

Illinois State Police granted firearm card after getting report from local police on shooting suspect

From CNN's Taylor Romine

In September 2019, Illinois State Police (ISP) received a “Clear and Present Danger report” from the Highland Park Police Department regarding threats Highland Park shooting suspect Robert “Bobby” Crimo III allegedly made against family members, the agency said in a statement Tuesday.

The agency added that they didn’t make any arrests at the time due to a lack of charges or further evidence of threats.

According to ISP, family members were not willing to file a complaint and no further information about additional threats or mental health issues was shared.

Because Crimo didn’t have an active Firearm Owners Identification (FOID) card or a pending request for one at the time, police decided “involvement with the matter was concluded.”

In December 2019, when Crimo was 19 years old, he applied for a FOID card that was sponsored by his father, ISD says.

Grandsons describe shooting victim Stephen Straus as full of life: "He was not ready to go by any means"

From CNN's Sharif Paget
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (7)

Stephen Straus.

Stephen Straus, an 88-year-old man identified by authorities as one of the seven victims killed in the Highland Park, Illinois, July Fourth parade mass shooting, was described by his family asgood humored and full of life.

Straus’ grandsons told CNN on Tuesday they hadacloserelationship withtheir grandfather who they saw almost every Sunday for weekly family dinners.

“He was very active, he enjoyed life,” Maxwell Straus, 18, told CNN. “He attended music festivals, loved to get outside, and biked into his 80s.”

Maxwell Straussaidthat his grandfather mentioned he was going to the parade during a recent dinner. “He was very excited,” Maxwell Strausrecalled.

When news about the shooting surfaced, Maxwell’s father, Jonathan Straus, grew very worried after Stephen failed to answer his phone.

A few hours later, the hospital called to confirm his death.

“Itwas shocking, hard to imagine,” Maxwell said.

Tobias Straus, 20, told CNN that hearing the news of his grandfather’s death was the “the worst thing imaginable to happen.”

“The gun lobby and America’s cultural worship of guns is deadly. It kills grandfathers,” he added.

Parents of 2-year-old boy among those killed in Highland Park shooting

From CNN's Alisha Ebrahimji,Sara SmartandEric Levenson
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (8)

Irina and Kevin McCarthy.

What was supposed to be a day of national celebration turned into a day of tragedy and fear when agunman killed seven peopleand injured dozens of others at a July Fourth parade in Highland Park, Illinois.

Now, yet another community in America is grieving the loss of family and friends: Among them, the parents of a 2-year-old boy.

Irina and Kevin McCarthy, who were killed in the shooting, are the parents of a toddler who was found alive after the parade shooting, according to a family member.

Irina Colon, who was related to Irina McCarthy, shared an undated photo with CNN of the couple at their wedding in Chicago.

Colon said she was not at the parade and found out about the couple’s death from Irina McCarthy’s father. The couple’s 2-year-old son, Aiden, will now be cared for by family members, Colon said.

Averified GoFundMe campaignthat Colon began said that in the aftermath of the violence, the young child was taken to safety by community members before his grandparents were located.

“On behalf of his family, and with their permission, I am establishing this fundraiser to support him and the caregivers who will be tasked with raising, caring for, and supporting Aiden as he and his support system embark on this unexpected journey,” it added.

The GoFundMe page had raised more than $725,000 by Tuesday evening.

Shooting suspect attended an April service at a local synagogue, congregation official says

From CNN’s Laura Klairmont and Joe Sutton

A Highland Park, Illinois, synagogue congregation official tells CNN that shooting suspect Robert E. Crimo was present at a Passover service in April at Central Avenue Synagogue.

The congregation official said Crimo did not act suspicious and left on his own.

“He didn’t look familiar, but didn’t do anything,” the congregation official told CNN.

In an earlier interview with CNN Newsroom with Ana Cabrera, Rabbi Yosef Schanowitz was asked about Crimo’s visit to his synagogue but noted he could not comment because it was an ongoing investigation.

“Well, I apologize, but I was directed by the authorities because the investigation is pending, not to talk [about] this item at the moment,” the Rabbi said.

Today, law enforcement told reporters they did not have any information regarding the visit and that they have not uncovered evidence to suggest the attack was religiously motivated.

Lake County state's attorney: "All of the people who died, steps from here, lost their freedom"

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (9)

A couple looks toward the scene of the mass shooting in downtown Highland Park, Illinois, on Tuesday, July 5.

Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart said that more needs to be done to prevent tragedies like the mass shooting that left at least seven people dead in Highland Park, Illinois, at a July 4th parade.

Rinehart highlighted the need to raise more awareness for the Illinois Firearm Restraining Order, a red flag law.

“The goal of this tool is toensure the safety of theindividual and those around him.It allows courts to temporarilyremove guns and prevent thepurchase of new guns byindividuals who pose asignificant risk,” he explained.

Rinehart also called for a ban on assault weapons in “Illinois and beyond.”

“As we go forward inthe courtroom and in the community, wemust do everything we can tomake sure that the horror thatmarked these streets, that echoedfrom these buildings neverhappens again,” he said.

Shooting suspect charged with 7 counts of first-degree murder

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (10)

The Highland Park, Illinois, shooting suspect, Robert E. Crimo III, has been charged with seven counts of first-degree murder, Lake County State’s Attorney Eric Rinehart announced.

Rinehart said he anticipates more charges in the future.

If Crimo is convicted on these seven charges, it will lead to a mandatory life sentence without the possibility of parole, Rinehart said. The official said that they will ask the judge tomorrow to hold Crimo “without the possibility of bail.”

“In the courtroom, we will seekthe maximum sentence againstthis offender.Not because we seek vengeance, but because justice and thehealing process demand it,” Rinehart said.

At least seven people were killed in the Monday shooting and dozens were injured.

In speech just miles from Highland Park, Harris makes full-throated call for assault weapons ban

From CNN's Nikki Carvajal
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (11)

Vice President Kamala Harris speaks at the National Education Association annual meeting in Chicago on July 5.

Speaking in Chicago, just miles from Highland Park, Vice President Kamala Harris pointedly told Congress to “have the courage” to act on an assault weapon ban and to “stop protecting” gun manufacturers.

“Yesterday, it should have been a day to come together with family and friends to celebrate our nation’s independence and instead, that community suffered a violent tragedy,” Harris said in remarks to the National Education Association on Tuesday.

“You know, I’ve said it before. Enough is enough!,” she said, her voice rising to applause from the group. “I mean, here we are, our nation is still mourning the loss of those 19 babies and their two teachers in Uvalde.”

She called the Uvalde shooting a “massacre” that served as “the most recent reminder in evolving of the risks that our children and our educators face every day.”

“Teachers should not have to practice barricading a classroom. Teachers should not have to know how to treat a gunshot wound. And teachers should not be told that lives would have been saved if only you had a gun,” Harris said.

Last month, President Biden signed into law a bipartisan gun safety measure that Harris called “progress,” but she said the country still has “to do more.”

She added that Congress needs to stop “protecting those gun manufacturers with the liability shield.”

“We cannot give up this fight. We will not tire. Because I know who you are,” she told the crowd. “That is just not in our nature.”

Harris’ comments came after Biden offered a fairly muted response to the shooting during the White House Independence Day celebration.

“You all heard what happened today.But each day, we’re reminded there’s nothing guaranteed about our democracy, nothing guaranteed about our way of life,” he said during an initial appearance at the BBQ.

Later, Biden held a moment of silence for the victims during the entertainment portion of the event.

On Tuesday, White House press secretary Karine Jean-Pierre was asked about Biden’s brief comments and her characterization that he had spoken “forcefully.” She said there had been “many times the President has spoken forcefully, urgently about a moment that that currently exists in our country, which is a gun violence epidemic.”

“To say that this President has not shown urgency, it’s just false,” she added.

NOW: Officials hold news conference on Highland Park shooting

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (12)

Eric Rinehart, the Lake County state attorney, is holding a news conference alongside other officials on the deadly Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting.

An official said earlier Tuesday that the state attorney’s office is slated to announce charges against the shooting suspect.

The suspect, Robert E. Crimo III, has been in police custody since being apprehended Monday evening, though no charges have been announced.

Former classmates describe Highland Park shooting suspect as withdrawn and odd

From CNN’s Curt Devine, Daniel A. Medina, Jeff Winter and Laura Klairmont

Former classmates of the Highland Park, Illinois, shooting suspect on Tuesday described him as an odd, soft-spoken kid who didn’t participate in class or school activities and showed little interest in engaging with his peers.

The few friends Robert “Bobby” Crimo III had tended to be troublemakers who seemed to relish the notion of being outsiders,a coupleof hisformerclassmates said.

“They wanted to be the ‘anti-’ group, like the rebels,” said Mackenzie, a former classmate who asked to be identified only by her first name to protect her privacy.“The aura they presented was opposite, negative and harsh.”

Mackenzie said she attended middle school and high school with Crimo and once shared a Spanish class with him.“Whenever I heard him speak, it was very lifeless and negative,” she said.“He’s always been down and not enthusiastic.”

One former classmate who requested anonymity for privacy reasons said he and Crimo used to hang out and play video games and skateboard together in middle school but that they drifted apart when they were freshmen at Highland Park High School.

“He was a skater kid,” he said of Crimo in middle school. “He would make YouTube videos all the time back then. Kind of DIY videos on how to grip a skateboard or replace a wheel, stuff like that.”

But in high school, the former classmate said, Crimo grew more insular and distant.

“He was always by himself,” he said. “No one seemed to try to be his friend.”

Just before Crimo dropped out of Highland Park High in 2017, he splattered “Awake” stickers in the school’s stairways and bathrooms, the former classmate said. Crimo made rap music under the name “Awake the Rapper.”

On Monday, when authorities announced that Crimo was “a person of interest” in the Fourth of July shooting, a one-time friend said he “was not shocked.”

Molly Handelman, who also said she attended middle school and high school with Crimo, described him as a “very quiet” guy. “When he did talk, he was very soft. He didn’t seem aggressive ever, at all.”

Handelman, who worked with Crimo on class projects a few times, said “something definitely seemed off” with him.

“If he was asked to speak, he definitely had an opinion,” she said. “I just remember if he was asked to speak, he would be like, ‘I don’t care,’ kind of thing.”

“He made it very clear he didn’t care about school,” Handelman said.“His friends got into trouble pretty often in school. He stayed pretty reserved and quiet, so it seemed pretty interesting how he was very quiet but his friends were very rebellious,” she added.

Handelman said she was shocked to learn of Monday’s shooting. “It’s very traumatizing. A lot of people in Highland Park feel like it’s a very safe community,” she said.

Another former classmate, who also requested CNN not use his name due to privacy concerns, said Crimo “kind of kept his head down, listened to music, walked through the hallways, minded his own business.” This classmate, however, said he didn’t think there was a darker side to Crimo’s reclusive nature. “By no means was I like ‘this kid has demons,’” he told CNN.

They dove on top of their grandkids to shield them during Highland Park mass shooting

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (13)

When Steve Tilkin first heard gunshots at the July Fourth parade in Highland Park, Illinois, it was his 13-year-old granddaughter who jumped into action first.

“I have no experience ingunshots, but I thought theywere just fireworks,” Tilkin said. This was the moment his granddaughter, who had been through active shooter drills, grabbed her 9-year-old brother and dove to the ground, shielding him.

He said he and his wife were standing “in a state of shock.” Soon, he and his wife both dove on top of both of the kids, trying to protect them from the gunfire.

Tilkin said he thinks the shots came from the rooftop of a building across the street from where they were standing. Police have said the shooting suspect fired more than 70 rounds from the roof of a business, although they have not disclosed a specific location.

Once the gunfire subsided, Tilkin and his family ran into a nearby store where a crowd of people was sheltering. The business owners helped everyone get into the basem*nt, away from the storefront.

After police swept the basem*nt where they were hiding, searching for the shooting suspect, Tilkin got his first look at the aftermath outside.

“I went to the window at thefront, just to look out, and Isaw there was a body there,about eight feet from where we werestanding and that body was surrounded bya pool of blood and I realize how close we were to getting shot,” he said.

Law enforcement received two previous reports in 2019 about shooting suspect, police say

Illinois law enforcement interacted with shooting suspect Robert E. Crimo III twice before a mass shooting at a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park on Monday, police said.

Crimo is in custody and has not yet been charged in connection to the shooting.

Deputy Chief Christopher Covelli, a spokesperson for the Lake County Sheriff’s Office, said in April 2019, someone contacted the Highland Park Police Department a week after learning that Crimo had attempted to die by suicide.

Since it was a delayed report, Covelli said police went to his house and spoke with Crimo and his parents.

“The matter was being handledby mental health professionalsat that time. There was no law enforcement action to be taken. It was a mental health issue handled by those professionals,” Covelli said.

He said the second interaction happened in September 2019 when a family member reported that Crimo had a collection of knives and he said “he was going to kill everyone.”

“The police responded to hisresidence.The police removed 16 knives, adagger and a sword from Crimo’shome,” Covelli said, adding that at that time, there was no probable cause to arrest Crimo because there were no complaints that were signed by any of the victims.

Investigators are seeking witness they believe saw suspect drop his gun after mass shooting, police say

Deputy Chief Christopher Covelli, a spokesperson for the Lake County Sheriff’s Office, said Tuesday that investigators are looking for a person they believe saw shooting suspect Robert E. Crimo III drop his rifle after the shooting at the Highland Park, Illinois, parade.

Covelli confirmed the object inside the red blanket was a rifle. The official said police haven’t been able to identifythe witness yet, but said if the person hears this request, to please call 1-800-Call-FBI.

Here are the names of the victims who were killed in the Highland Park mass shooting

All but one of the victims of the Highland Park parade mass shooting were identified Tuesday during a news conference.

Here are the names of the victims, according to Lake Country Coroner Jennifer Banek:

  • Katherine Goldstein, 64 of Highland Park
  • Irina McCarthy, 35 of Highland Park
  • Kevin McCarthy, 37 of Highland Park
  • Jacquelyn Sundheim, 63 of Highland Park
  • Stephen Straus, 88 of Highland Park
  • Nicolas Toledo-Zaragoza, 78 of Morelos, Mexico

A seventh victim died from injuries Tuesday. Their name has not yet been released.

State attorney expected to announce charges against suspect this evening, official says

Deputy Chief Christopher Covelli, a spokesperson for the Lake County Sheriff’s Office, said the state attorney’s office is expected to announce charges against the shooting suspect during a news conference at 6:30 p.m. ET (5:30 p.m. CT).

“We anticipate an announcement ofcharges at this time,” Covelli said.

The shooting suspect remains in custody following the deadly shooting of at least seven people at a Highland Park, Illinois, Fourth of July parade on Monday.

Grandmother who attended Highland Park parade says she wants action, not prayers following deadly shooting

From CNN’s Amanda Musa
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (15)

A Highland Park, Illinois, grandmother says she is “done” with gun violence after being forced to hide with her family as a gunman opened fire Monday during a 4th of July parade.

Bobbie Katz Hinden told CNN on Tuesday that she has been attending Highland Park’s 4th of July parade for 30 years.

She was celebrating the holiday with her two adult children and her 3-year-old grandson.

Katz Hinden says more needs to be done to prevent these acts of violence.

“This morning when I told my kids that I was going to join you. They were shocked that I said yes. And they said ‘Mom, just tell your story. Don’t be political.’” Katz Hinden told CNN. “But I do have to share with you that I’m done. I don’t want people’s prayers. I don’t want their sympathy. We have to do something about this.”

When asked if she would ever take her grandson to a parade again, Katz Hinden told Alisyn Camerota: “That’s a really good question. I’d like to think that my life can go on.”

Katz Hinden, who also runs a childcare center in the area, says they are doing their best to make sure the community gets the healing it needs.

At least seven peoplewere killed in the shooting and dozens have been injured,officials say

Death toll rises to 7 in Highland Park mass shooting

From CNN’s Joe Sutton

A seventh victim has died from Monday’s fatal mass shooting during a parade in Highland Park, Illinois, Mayor Nancy Rotering tells CNN.

According to an update from the NorthShore University Health System, a total of 39 people were received at four hospitals from the shooting yesterday.

Highland Park resident says city's gun safety laws drew her there. Years later, she was caught in gunfire

From CNN's Eric Levenson in Highland Park, Illinois
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (16)

An American flag is flown at half-staff in Highland Park, Illinois, on July 5.

Maggie Schmieder, 40, was sitting with her family and friends in front of the Dairy Queen in Highland Park, Illinois, along the parade route and described the moments after the shooting more as “chaotic calm” than terror or panic.

“People weren’t like sprinting or diving down,” she said. “It was like there was this confusion, but people automatically started going.”

She and her family fled the area and eventually made their way to their car before driving away from the scene safely.

Schmieder works as a teacher and said she has prepared for a mass shooting at her school.

She told CNN that she moved to Highland Park eight years ago, a year after the city’s 2013 move to ban assault rifles, a push that played into her decision to relocate.

“One of the reasons we sought out Highland Park and chose to live here was due to some of those strict ideas about gun laws, safety, a relatively liberal, forward-thinking, educated community that we felt safe raising our children in,” she said. “I think now the takeaway here is that, while everything that could have been done possibly in terms of those laws, and police presence that was there, and preparedness, and it still wasn’t preventable. It still wasn’t stopped.”

She agreed with Highland Park’s mayor saying that the patchwork of gun laws makes restrictions difficult on a local level.

“Our laws tried to protect the citizens and reflect our values here, but that doesn’t mean they can’t cross county lines, cross-town lines, cross state lines and bring these weapons back in,” she said.

Illinois leaders discuss bipartisan bill to address gun safety after Highland Park shooting

CNN’s Raja Razek
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (17)

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot, along with Democratic Rep. Robin Kelly and other leaders, reacted to the shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, as they discussed the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act at Aunt Martha’s Southeast Chicago Community Health Center.

At least six peoplewere killed in the shootingduring a 4th of July parade, and dozens have been injured, officials said. Theshooting suspect, who has not been charged, was taken into custody Monday evening. He used a “high-powered rifle” in the attack, police said.

President Biden in Junesigned into law the first major federal gun safety legislationpassed in decades, marking a significant bipartisan breakthrough on one of the most contentious policy issues in Washington.The legislation came together in the aftermath of recent mass shootings at a Uvalde, Texas, elementary school and a Buffalo, New York, supermarket that was in a predominantly Black neighborhood.

“This act also closes what is known as the boyfriend loophole by broadening limits on firearm purchases by people who have abused romantic and intimate partners,” she added.

Rep. Kelly also spoke about the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act and “why we have to keep working.

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (18)

“Just yesterday in Highland Park, we lost six people to gun violence,” she said. “People were there just to enjoy their Independence Day weekend.” The lawmaker added the suspect “tore their worlds apart with a gun.”

According to Kelly, an important aspect of the bill for Chicago is the community violence intervention.

“We can pass all the laws that we want, but if we don’t invest in our young people, we don’t invest in our neighborhood, if we don’t invest in our communities, those gun laws are not going to mean a whole lot,” she said. “This new law includes a direct $250 million investment in community violence, intervention, funding and investments into many of the programs to curb violence.”

39 people from Highland Park parade shooting treated at area hospitals

From CNN’s Ashley Killough and Rebekah Riess

A total of 39 people were received at four hospitals from the mass shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, yesterday, according to an update from Jim Anthony, senior director of public relations at NorthShore University Health System.

They were either transported to the hospital or drove themselves to the hospital, according to Deputy Chief Christopher Covelli, a spokesperson for the Lake County Sheriff’s Office. They were injured by gunfire, he said.

The patients were received at hospitals in Highland Park, Evanston, Skokie and Glenbrook, Anthony said.

Anthony said nine patients now remain hospitalized in their health system, and their ages range from 14 to 70s. Four patients are in good condition; another four are in stable condition; and one patient, a 69-year old man, is in critical condition with a gunshot wound at Evanston Hospital, Anthony told CNN.

Eight of the nine current patients suffered gunshot wounds, according to Anthony.

Of the 39 total patients, 28 patients have been treated and discharged, Anthony said.

An 8-year-old boy was transported to University of Chicago Comer Children’s Hospital, and one patient died yesterday while receiving critical care in the Highland Park Hospital Emergency Department, he said.

Woman injured in Highland Park shooting stampede: "It’ll be a long healing process"

From CNN’s Eric Levenson in Highland Park, Illinois
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (19)

Barbara Medina at the parade on Monday with her daughter Caroline, 7, and her son Christian, 12.

Barbara Medina, 46, was injured in the shooting — not by gunfire, but by the stampede.

She was marching in the parade holding the banner for Community Partners for Affordable Housing (CPAH) when she heard gunshots ring out. A sea of people rushed toward her, so she dropped the banner, grabbed her 7-year-old daughter, Caroline, and her scooter and ran. She got split up from her 12-year-old son and her father in the chaos.

Medina fled down an alley and noticed her daughter slowing down behind her. She reached back to grab her daughter and help her along, but tripped on her scooter and fell hard on her left arm. She knew immediately it was broken.

“I could see it went the wrong way, and I had to kind of maneuver it back. It was very painful,” she said.

After making it to a stranger’s home, she learned that her son and father were safe and sheltering elsewhere. She borrowed a sling and an ice pack and propped her arm up on some pillows to relieve the pain. Hours later, she went to Skokie Hospital, a non-trauma hospital, to get her arm set, and doctors diagnosed her with a broken proximal radius just below the elbow. She now has a cast from the tips of her fingers to the top of her shoulder and expects to be in a cast for about six to eight weeks.

Her arm is sore but she said she was thankful she and her family weren’t seriously injured.

In the wake of parade mass shooting, McConnell touts bipartisan gun law

From CNN's Ali Zaslav
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (20)

In the wake of the mass shooting at the July 4 parade in Highland Park, Illinois, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell did not explicitly say Congress should do more to address gun violence, instead saying that the recently passed bipartisan gun legislation has “targeted the problem,” which he said is mental health.

“I think yesterday’s shooting is another example of what the problem is. The problem is mental health and these young men who seem to be inspired to commit these atrocities. So, I think the bill that we passed targeted the problem. In that particular instance, it was school safety and mental health,” McConnell said.

More context: Studies show, however, that people with severe mental illnesses aremore than 10 times more likely to be victimsof violent crime than the general population and only about 3% to 5% of violent acts can be attributed to serious mental illness, according to theUS Department of Health and Human Services.

In his prepared remarks at the Paducah Area Chamber of Commerce Public Policy Luncheon in Paducah, Kentucky, on Tuesday, McConnell generally referenced recent shootings and the new bipartisan gun legislation, but didn’t specifically speak to the shooting in Highland Park.

“Recently, in the wake of all of these shootings, I joined both sides in the Senate in passing a bill related to school safety and mental illness,” he said in a speech, “while at the same time not infringing upon anybody’s Second Amendment rights.”

He did address the Illinois parade shooting when asked by a reporter after his speech.

Doctor waiting for family at parade describes treating gunshot victim moments after shooting began

From CNN's Elise Hammond
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (21)

Dr. Wendy Binstock Rush, an anesthesiologist who was at the Fourth of July parade where the shooting unfolded, said several people with medical training tried to help those who were shot during the event in Highland Park, Illinois.

A suspected gunman killed six people and injured dozens of others when he opened fire into the parade crowd from the roof of a building. Police say the suspected shooter used a “high-powered rifle” to fire more than 70 rounds on Monday.

Binstock Rush said she was waiting for her family to arrive at the parade when the shooting began. She said it seemed like the gunfire was close to where she was standing.

When the gunfire stopped, she identified herself as an anesthesiologist physician and was led to what she says was the “most critical person at the time” — a man who was “profusely bleeding” from his abdomen, she said.

“CPR was in progress.People were holding pressure onan abdominal wound that he wasprofusely bleeding from,” she said, adding that they continued CPR and started IV fluids to try to offset the blood he was losing.

Eventually, paramedics showed up and put the man in an ambulance.

“We took him into thehospital, and we spent aboutanother 20 to 30 minutes workingon him, but unfortunately, hehad lost way too much blood and his injuries were too severe andhe did perish at thehospital,” she said.

Residents say they'd seen the suspect in the area and recognized him from his face tattoos and colorful hair

From CNN's Eric Levenson in Highland Park, Illinois

Some residents of Highland Park, Illinois, told CNN that they recognized shooting suspect Robert E. Crimo III, after police released photos of him due to his distinctive appearance, stating that they had seen him recently around the area.

Eric Januszewski and Kate McCarney live just a block away from the shooting scene and came out Tuesday morning with their rescue dog Biff to see the crime scene. A day earlier, Januszewski was at his home during the parade, heard the gunshots and saw the stampede of people fleeing. He offered waters and sodas to police in the hours afterward as they baked in the sun.

Both recognized the suspect, Crimo, from previous run-ins, primarily due to his colorful hair and prominent face tattoos. At a recent carnival in Highwood, Januszewski said he commented to Crimo about the face tattoos, noting they were “quite a commitment.” Crimo agreed and then told Januszewski to check out his SoundCloud account, he said.

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (22)

Ellen Cohen and Rob Phillips

Other residents who were at the Fourth of July parade reflected on the chaotic scene that ensued once the shooting started.

Ellen Cohen and Rob Phillips attended the parade and set up their chairs near its start, a block away from Central Avenue, where the shooting ultimately took place. They wanted to avoid the crowds.

They snapped a selfie of themselves smiling and enjoyed watching a group of kids bike through the parade route just minutes prior to the start of the official parade. About 10-15 minutes after the parade began, they heard what they thought was fireworks and ultimately realized were gunshots and ran from the area. Ellen left behind her cell phone and returned hours later to retrieve it.

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (23)

Robert E. Crimo III.

For two residents, a last minute decision to skip the parade left them wondering what would have happened if they hadn’t change their mind.

Anisah and Steve Mihaljevic live on Central Avenue and Linden Avenue, just a block from the parade route. They were in Skokie, Illinois, visiting her parents on Monday morning and considered coming home for the parade after an invite from some friends. But they decided not to, partly out of laziness — a decision that left them wondering, “What if?”

“It was just so random that we ended up not being here,” Anisah told CNN, sitting on a bench near the crime scene. “It was one of those random decisions that ends up changing your life.”

They noted that last month, on June 11, there was a March For Our Lives rally in downtown Highland Park and at Sunset Park, where the parade ends. Their daughters attended and held signs calling for change.

FBI inspecting parade area where people hastily left belongings as they ran for safety

From CNN's Eric Levenson in Highland Park, Illinois
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (24)

Members of the FBI conduct a search after the shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, on Monday.

The FBI is combing the area of the mass shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, for evidence.

On the morning after Monday’s shooting, three blocks of Central Avenuein downtown Highland Park remain blocked off behind police lines.

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (25)

Flowers lay near the scene of the shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, on Tuesday.

FBI agents today have been inspecting belongings left behind by people attending the July 4 parade in the city yesterday, including folding chairs, blankets and a child’s car stroller.

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (26)

A police officer walks through the scene of the shooting on Monday.

Both inside and outside the police tape, overturned lawn chairs and other items remain strewn on the ground. Spotted among the items were a Dunkin’ Donuts iced coffee that was overrun by ants, a half-eaten cup of noodles, a toy truck, sunscreen, bottles of water, dog treats and a stuffed Sonic the Hedgehog toy

The suspected shooter killedat least six peopleand injured dozens of others on Monday. The suspect, who was taken into custody later Monday, climbed onto a rooftop of a business andopened fireon the parade about 20 minutes after it started.

Bystanders said they initially thought the sound of gunfire was fireworks.

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (27)

FBI agents investigate at the scene of the shooting on Tuesday.

The area is a wealthy suburb through and through. On the east end of the police tapeis a Metra train crossing and St. John’s Avenue; the four corners are a Veterans Memorial to Highland Park soldiers, a parking lot, a salon, and a bank. On the west end of the police tape is Green Bay Road; on itscorners are a gas station and an Anthropologie store.

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (28)

People’s belongings lie abandoned along the parade route on Tuesday.

Here's what we know so far about what happened during the parade shooting that killed 6 people

From CNN staff
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (29)

Members of the FBI walk the scene one day after the shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, on Tuesday.

Police are releasing new details about what they believe happened during a shooting at a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, that killed six people on Monday. The suspected gunman, Robert E. Crimo III, is in custody but has not yet been charged.

Police say the shooting suspect used a “high-powered rifle” — which was purchased legally in Illinois — to shoot more than 70 rounds into the crowd from the roof of a building. Law enforcement said they have not yet determined a motive, but they believe the attack was planned for several weeks.

Here’s what else police say happened:

  • The suspected gunman was dressed in women’s clothing during the attack and investigators believe he did so to conceal his facial tattoos and his identity, according to Deputy Chief Christopher Covelli, a spokesperson for the Lake County Sheriff’s Office. After the shooting, the suspect exited the roof, dropped his rifle and blended in with the crowd as he escaped, police say.
  • After the shooting, police say the suspect walked to his mother’s house and took her vehicle. Police released the information about the vehicle on Monday afternoon, and someone called 911 when they saw Crimo and the car, Covelli said.
  • When officers pulled over the vehicle, they found a second rifle — also purchased by Crimo, Covelli said. He said that police believe the suspected shooter acted alone.
  • Police in Highwood, Illinois – the hometown of Crimo — had no prior crime-related interactions with the suspected shooter, said Highwood Police Department Chief Dave Wentz.

What comes next:

Covelli said that investigators are not ready to announce charges yet against the shooting suspect. He added that investigators are stilldeveloping leads and reviewing “criticalinformation.”Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering told CNN she expects charges to be announced later Tuesday.

At the same time, FBI agents today have been inspecting belongings left behind by people attending the July 4th parade in the city yesterday, including folding chairs, blankets and a child’s car stroller.

Family describes Highland Park shooting victim Nicolas Toledo as "creative, adventurous and funny"

From CNN’sAna Melgar Zuniga, Fidel Gutierrez and David Williams
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (30)

Nicolas Toledo

Nicolas Toledo, 78, was identified as one of the victims of the mass shootingin downtown Highland Park, Illinois, during a Fourth of July parade, an official of the Mexican state of Morelos confirmed to CNN.

Six of Toledo’s eight children live in the United States. One of them was injured in the shooting as well as two other members of the Toledo family, according to a statement from Mexican authorities.

Toledo loved to paint, go fishing and go on walks with his family in the park, his granddaughter Kimberly Rangel told CNN affiliate WBBM.

Xochil Toledo, another grandchild, started a GoFundMe page, where she describes Toledo as a “loving man” who was “creative, adventurous and funny.”

“As a family we are broken, and numb,” she wrote, adding that her grandfather is now the family’s guardian angel and asked people to keep them in her prayers.

“I love you abuelito. Descansa en paz,” she wrote.

According to the official in Mexico, Toledo’s family wants to repatriate him to Mexico.

YouTube and Spotify remove content tied to Highland Park shooting suspect

From CNN's Brian Fung

YouTube and Spotify have removed content tied to the Highland Park shooting suspect from their platforms, the companies confirmed to CNN on Tuesday.

The content in question had been posted to multiple online streaming services and contained ominous lyrics and animated scenes of gun violence, CNN previously reported.

“Following the horrific incident in Highland Park, our Trust and Safety teams identified and quickly removed violative content, in accordance with our Community Guidelines,” YouTube said in a statement.

“Spotify, in partnership with the distributor, has removed the content in question,” Spotify said in a statement.

The companies declined to answer CNN’s questions about whether the suspect’s content had been flagged or reported previously for violations of the platforms’ respective terms of service. The companies also declined to say when precisely they removed the suspect’s content.

CNN has also reached out to Apple Music, Amazon Music, Tidal and Pandora with similar questions, but the companies have not yet responded.

Biden orders flags to half-staff to honor Highland Park victims

From CNN's Betsy Klein

President Biden is honoring the victims of the mass shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, on Tuesday with a proclamation calling for the flags to be lowered to half-staff through Saturday.

“I hereby order that the flag of the United States shall be flown at half-staff at the White House and upon all public buildings and grounds, at all military posts and naval stations, and on all naval vessels of the Federal Government in the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its Territories and possessions until sunset, July 9, 2022,” Biden said in a statement.

Suspect was wearing women's clothing to blend into the crowd after shooting, police say

From CNN’s Rebekah Riess

The suspected gunman was dressed in women’s clothing during Monday’s attack and investigators believe he did so to conceal his facial tattoos and his identity, according to Deputy Chief Christopher Covelli, a spokesperson for the Lake County Sheriff’s Office.

Covelli said the suspect’s disguise helped him blend in with the other people who were fleeing the scene.

Following the attack the suspect exited the roof, dropped his rifle and blended in with the crowd as he escaped, Covelli said. According to police, the suspected gunman then walked to his mother’s home, who lived in the area, where he took his mother’s vehicle.

Covelli said he wasn’t sure exactly of what the women’s attire consisted of, but noted that it was initially reported the person had long hair, meaning the suspect could have been wearing a wig.

Here's how the Highland Park shooting suspect was caught, according to authorities

The suspect in Monday’s mass shooting in Highland Park, Illinois, fired at the Independence Day parade-goers from a roof. After shooting “more than 70 rounds” in the crowd, he exited the roof, dropped his rifle and blended in with the crowd to escape, according to Deputy Chief Christopher Covelli.

The gunman has been identified as Robert “Bobby” E. Crimo III.

“We issued an alert yesterday afternoon,” Covelli continued, saying officials provided the vehicle’s information and Crimo’s information.

Covelli thanked “an alert memberof the community” who saw the vehicle and called 911.

“An alert North Chicago Police officer spotted the vehicle, waited for additionalbackup units to arrive,conducted a traffic stop, andthey were able to safelyapprehend Crimo with no injuries to the officers,” Covelli added.

A second rifle — also purchased by Crimo — was found in the vehicle, Covelli added.

Currently, the suspect remains in custody and “by all indications, it appearsCrimo was acting by himself,” Covelli noted.

Police have not determined a motive yet for Highland Park shooting, according to deputy chief

Law enforcement said that no motive has been established yet for the suspected shooter to carry out the deadly attack at the Highland Park, Illinois, July 4 parade.

The official also said that at this time, they have no information to suggest the attack was “racially motivated, motivated by religion or any other protected status.”

Videos with violent imagery from the suspect that were posted online are being reviewed, he added.

Investigators are not ready to announce charges against suspect yet, police say

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (31)

Deputy Chief Christopher Covelli, a spokesperson for the Lake County Sheriff’s Office, said that investigators are not ready to announce charges yet against the shooting suspect.

“The Lake County state’sattorney’s office has been withus from the ground level.They were with us this morningand through the night.We continue to review theinformation,” Covelli said.

He added that investigators are stilldeveloping leads and reviewing “criticalinformation.”

“Once we’re at a point wherewe’re ready to review all ofthat information for charges,we’ll sit down with the state’sattorney” to discuss criminalcharges, Covelli said.

Some more context: Earlier on Tuesday, Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering told CNN that she expects the suspected shooter, Robert Crimo III, to be charged today

“My understanding is thatthey’ll be levying charges latertoday,” Rotering told CNN’s Jim Sciutto.

At least six peoplewere killed anddozens were injured in a shootingin downtown Highland Park, Illinois, during a Fourth of July parade on Monday, officials said. Police took the suspect into custody Monday evening.

Parade shooting suspect planned attack over several weeks, police say

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (32)

A police officer walks through downtown Highland Park, the scene of the shooting, on Monday.

Highland Park parade shooting suspect Robert “Bobby” E. Crimo III planned the attack that killed at least six people in the Illinois city over a few weeks, according to police.

“Based on where we’re at, at this point of the investigation —and some of this is preliminaryso is subject to change as we keep moving forward — but we dobelieve Crimo pre-planned thisattack for several weeks,” according to Deputy Chief Christopher Covelli of the Lake County Sheriff’s Office.

Investigators have spoken to witnesses and reviewed video clips over the past 24 hours, he said.

Parade shooting suspect acted alone, police say

Deputy Chief Christopher Covelli, of the Lake County Sheriff’s Office, said the suspected gunman, Robert E. Crimo III, was acting by himself. Crimo was taken into custody after at least six people were shot during a 4th of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, on Monday.

Covelli said Crimo is still in custody as investigators and the state’s attorney’s office continue to review the information emerging from the investigation.

Shooting suspect fired more than 70 rounds into the crowd, authorities say

The gun used to fire at the July 4 parade in Highland Park, Illinois, was purchased by the suspected gunman legally in Illinois, according to Deputy Chief Christopher Covelli from the Lake County Sheriff’s Office.

During the attack, the official said they believe the suspect, Robert “Bobby” Crimo III, fired “more than 70 rounds” from this rifle into the crowd.

Covelli noted that the suspect used a high-powered rifle that shot high velocity rounds, “similar to an AR-15.”

Crimo was also in possession of a second rifle, which was found in his vehicle when he was pulled over by police, and also had other firearms that were recovered from a Highwood, Illinois, residence that he was living in. “I know that there were potentially pistols that he had owned as well,” Covelli said.

There is “no indication the weapons were modified,” according to the deputy chief.

CNN’s Rebekah Riess contributed reporting to this post.

Police chief of suspected parade shooter's hometown says they had no prior crime-related interactions with him

From CNN’s Curt Devine

Police in Highwood, Illinois – the hometown of the suspected Highland Park shooter Robert “Bobby” Crimo III — had no prior crime-related interactions with Crimo, said Highwood Police Department Chief Dave Wentz.

Wentz said the only contact the department has had with Crimo involved a non-criminal incident in which Crimo was present when he was a juvenile.

“We literally have nothing on him,” said Wentz. “He was not potentially involved in anything. He was present for something non-criminal.”

Biden says he's "not sure yet" if he will travel to Highland Park

From CNN's Betsy Klein

President Biden was asked Tuesday whether he intends to travel to Highland Park, Illinois, where a gunman opened fire at a Fourth of July parade, killing at least six and injuring 25 people.

“I’m not sure yet,” he said as he departed a Medal of Honor ceremony in the East Room of the White House with the first lady.

In a statement yesterday, Biden said that “Jill and I are shocked by the senseless gun violence that has yet again brought grief to an American community on this Independence Day.” Biden noted that he had “surged Federal law enforcement to assist in the urgent search for the shooter,” and pointed to thegun safety legislationhe recently signed into law.

Police say the Highland Park shooting was both "random" and "intentional." A CNN analyst explains.

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (33)

Police said the attack on the July 4 Highland Park parade that killed at least six people appeared to be “random” and “intentional.”

Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, a CNN law enforcement analyst, explained how both can be true:

Police believe the suspected shooter, who was taken into custody later Monday, climbed onto a rooftop of a business andopened fireon the parade about 20 minutes after it started. The shooter has not been charged.

Parade witness says son asked if a shooter will be at every July 4 parade

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (34)

DavidGoldenberg, a witness at the Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting, said his youngest child asked before going to bed if there will be a shooter at every Fourth of July parade.

Goldenberg said all three of them are at camp this morning.

“Being with their friends isimportant.… We’ve learned this lesson oflistening to them, trying toanswer all those questions,trying to be patient as we tryto cope as parents and asresidents of Highland Park. It’s tough,” he said.

Goldenberg, who is also the Midwest regionaldirector for the Anti-DefamationLeague, said the scene was chaotic and frightening as he tried to get his three kids away to safety.

This Highland Park resident directed children and others looking for shelter into a synagogue

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (35)

Michla Schanowitz was outsideher synagogue at the heart of theparade route in Highland Park, Illinois, just four blocks awayfrom where the shooting happened,when she saw crowds runningtowards her.

“We were sitting peacefully,enjoying ourselves — such a goodfeeling. The weather was nice,people were out. It was a verywarm, connected, friendlycommunity.And it was about 10 minutesinto the parade, and it becameclear that something had gonewrong,” she told CNN. “I just see peopleabandoning their chairs, theirblankets, strollers, and peoplejust running, running towardswhere we were.”

That’s when she guided her great nieces and nephews — the oldest of them was 10 years old — into the synagogue and opened the doors to anyone else looking for shelter.

“Calmly, I just said to thechildren, ‘we’re going to goinside the synagogue. It is ahot day, we’ll get a drink.’[I] opened the doors and invitedanybody in the area who wassitting there, because everyonewas looking for shelter. ‘Justcome inside, come inside, dooris open, come in the synagogue,we’ll be safe in here,’” Schanowitz added.

She said she is still processing what happened yesterday.

“It is difficult.It is very hard to process.There is a lot to process.It is unfathomable thatsomething like this can happenin our country,” Schanowitz said.

Highland Park mayor says she expects suspected shooter to be charged Tuesday

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (36)

Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering

Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering told CNN Tuesday that she expects the suspected shooter, Robert Crimo III, to be charged today

“My understanding is thatthey’ll be levying charges latertoday,” Rotering told CNN’s Jim Sciutto.

At least six peoplewere killed anddozens were injured in a shootingin downtown Highland Park, Illinois, during a Fourth of July parade on Monday, officials said. Police took the suspect into custody Monday evening.

Rotering told CNN it is her understanding that the weapon used by the alleged shooter in Monday’s mass shooting in her city was purchased legally.

The mayor also said several of the suspect’s online postings “reflected a plan and a desire to commit carnage for a long time in advance.”

Earlier on Tuesday, she told NBC that she didn’t believe he was previously known to police.

Parade shooting suspect legally obtained the weapon used, Highland Park mayor says

From CNN’s Adrienne Broaddus, Jason Kravarik and Rebekah Riess

Highland Park Mayor Nancy Rotering told CNN it is her understanding that the weapon used by the alleged shooter in Monday’s mass shooting in her city was purchased legally.

“That being said, again, if you can have a weekly mass shooting with a legally purchased gun, then I think we need to talk about why those laws aren’t protecting the very people that they’re supposed to be protecting,” Rotering told CNN’s Adrienne Broaddus. “Let’s be honest, we need to make it more difficult for people to create carnage.”

At least six peoplewere killed anddozens were injured in a shootingin downtown Highland Park, Illinois, during a Fourth of July parade, officials said. Police took the suspect into custody Monday evening.

The mayor said she had known the shooting suspect, Robert E. Crimo III, when she was his Cub Scout pack leader.

“Many years ago, he was just alittle boy, a quiet little boy that Iknew,” she said.

Rotering earlier told NBC that she didn’t believe he was previously known to police.

The mayor said several of Crimo’s online postings “reflected a plan and a desire to commit carnage for a long time in advance.”

“And it’s one of those things where you step back and you say, ‘What happened? How did somebody become this angry, this hateful?’ To then take it out on innocent people who literally were just having a family day out,” Rotering added.

Rotering said the focus in the discussion about the shooting should be about “the fact that there are weapons of war on our streets, that people can legally obtain these and then take out dozens of people.”

Doctor who treated victims at parade shooting says the dead had "wartime injuries"

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (37)

Dr. David Baum, who treated victims in the Highland Park shooting on Monday, described some of the horrific injuries he witnessed.

Baum and his wife were at the parade, and their grandson was a participant. When their family ran away from the shooting, the doctor ran toward the scene.

Baum said some of the dead were “blown up.”

Speaking as parade-goers’ belongings could be seen abandoned at the scene in the background, Baum said the suburban community in Illinois will never be the same.

“I grew up here, and I moved back here with mywife.We raised our kids here.My daughter and my son-in-lawmoved here because they wereconcerned about gun violence andcarjackings in the city whenthey had their son.And now people are, you know,they’re scared to take theirkids to nursery school.But what I saw was justfamilies’ lives forever changedbecause they were walking downwith their kids and theirscooters and somebody whoshouldn’t have had access to ahigh-powered rifle got up on arooftop and decided to do whathe wanted to do,” Baum said.

Robert E. Crimo III, identified by police as the person suspected of shooting and killing six people and wounding dozens of others at the July 4 parade, was arrested on Monday hours after the shooting.

Debra Baum said people were killed within 30 seconds.

“Today, it’s just hitting me morehow sad I am.And I’m also thinking we all have tochange our behavior until thisgets under control.I’m not going to a paradeanymore.I’m not going to a sportsevent.I’m afraid for my grandson to goto school.We all have to change ourbehavior and not do the thingswe love to do because of thissituation,” she said.

Witness describes hiding son in dumpster as shots rang out at parade

From CNN’s Chris Boyette and Christine Sever
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (38)

AlexanderSandoval

Alexander Sandoval ran with his son soon after hearing gunshots at the parade in Highland Park, Illinois, eventually hiding his son in a dumpster while he went back to find other family members, he told CNN affiliate WLS.

“I thought that it was the Navy that was saluting the flag with rifles, but then when I saw people running, I picked up my son and started running,” Sandoval said. “… We ran behind the building and I put my son in a dumpster and he sat there with his dog, and I went back to look for the rest of my family.”

Sandavol said he left his son with someone hiding behind the dumpsterwhile he went tofind the rest of his family who had also run away when the shooting started.

“I went back. There was a few people shot on the ground and there was a little boy that was in one of the police officers arms and that’s that was the worst experience ever. Because, you know, all I thought about was my son and I can only imagine what that family is going through,” he told WLS.

Former preschool teacher identified as a victim of July Fourth parade shooting

From CNN's Amanda Musa and Chris Boyette
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (39)

JackiSundheim

Jacki Sundheim has been identified by her synagogue as one of the six people killed in the Fourth of July parade shooting in Highland Park, Illinois.

The North Shore Congregation Israel in Glencoe, Illinois, said in a statement that Sundheim was a lifelong congregant of the synagogue and a member of staff, having been a preschool teacher and events coordinator.

“There are no words sufficient to express the depth of our grief for Jacki’s death and sympathy for her family and loved ones,” the statement said. “We know you join us in the deepest prayer that Jacki’s soul will be bound up in the shelter of God’s wings and her family will somehow find comfort and consolation amidst this boundless grief.”

It's 5 a.m. in Highland Park. Here are the latest developments

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (40)

A Lake County, Illinois, police officer walks down Central Avenue in Highland Park on July 4, after a shooter fired on the Fourth of July parade.

Shortly after 10 a.m. CT Monday, a gunman began firing into a crowd of people attending a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, just north of Chicago. Six people were killed and dozens were wounded, officials say, and the suspect was later apprehended by police following a brief vehicle chase.

A day after gun violence rocked yet another American community, witnesses are processing the traumatic event and investigators are piecing together how it happened.

Here are the latest developments in the Highland Park parade shooting:

Suspect apparently posted violent imagery online: The suspected gunman, Robert E. Crimo III, posted music on several major streaming outlets and on a personal website under the name “Awake the Rapper,” featuring animated scenes of gun violence and ominous sounding lyrics. In one music videotitled “Are you Awake,” Crimo is seen with multicolored hair and face tattoos and is narrating, “I need to just do it. It is my destiny.” The video shows a cartoon animation of a stick-figure man – who resembles Crimo – in tactical gear carrying out an attack with a rifle.The videos appear to have been posted online last year.

Suspect’s uncle saw no warning signs, he says: An uncle of the suspect told CNN he saw no warning signs that would prompt him to believe his nephew would have been involved in such a tragedy. “I’m heartbroken. I’m so heartbroken,” Paul A. Crimo said, expressing remorse for the families of the victims and adding he spoke at length to law enforcement Monday about his nephew. The suspect lives in an apartment behind the house owned by his father, Paul said, adding that he last saw his nephew Sunday evening looking at his computer and not acting out of the ordinary.

Former preschool teacher identified as one of the victims: Jacki Sundheim was identified as one of the people who died in the shooting by her synagogue. The North Shore Congregation Israel in Glencoe, Illinois, said in astatementthat Sundheim was a lifelong congregant of the synagogue and a member of staff, having been a preschool teacher and events coordinator.

Senator says more must be done: Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, the Senate majoritywhip, touted the recently passed bipartisan gun bill as an important step to combat gun violence, but said there are things the legislation didn’t address. “There is no reason for a person to own a military assault weapon. It has no value for hunting, or sports or even self-defense,” he said. “It is a killing machine.” The gun used in Monday’s shooting was a “high-powered rifle” and the attack appeared to be “random” and “intentional,” said Christopher Covelli, spokesperson for the Lake County Major Crime Task Force.

"It was right on top of us": Witness describes horror of parade-goers ducking for cover from gunfire

From CNN's Jason Hanna, Adrienne Broaddus, Eric Levenson and Susannah Cullinane

Larry Bloom, a Highland Park resident of 15 years, told CNN he had cycled to the parade and was standing just to the right of a bandstand when he heard a “pop, pop, pop.”

It was early in the celebrations and there were a lot of people present, Bloom said: “Just imagine a full audience for a parade, it was that many people. It was hundreds of people just in that area – just all running in the same direction,” he said.

The shots felt like they were coming from across the street and aimed at the area of the crowd he was in, Bloom said, though it was hard for him to establish where the gunman was.

Police have said firearm evidence was found on the rooftop of a nearby business.

When the gunshots stopped and it cleared out and the police moved in, most people left the area, Bloom said.

Read more about the aftermath of the shooting here:

HIGHLAND PARK, IL - JULY 04: First responders work the scene of a shooting at a Fourth of July parade on July 4, 2022 in Highland Park, Illinois. Reports indicate at least five people were killed and 19 injured in the mass shooting. (Photo by Jim Vondruska/Getty Images) Jim Vondruska/Getty Images Related article July Fourth celebrations in Highland Park, Illinois, end in terror after mass shooting leaves 6 dead and dozens injured | CNN

Chicago sports teams express support, sympathy for Highland Park

From CNN's Travis Caldwell
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (42)

Chicago White Sox manager Tony La Russa, left, and his coaches bow their heads during a moment of silence at Guaranteed Rate Field for the victims of a Fourth of July parade shooting in nearby Highland Park, Ill., on July 4.

Following Monday’s deadly mass shooting at a parade in nearby Highland Park, many of Chicago’s sports teams gave statements expressing their sympathies to the victims and community.

MLB’s Chicago White Sox canceled a planned post-game fireworks celebration Monday due to the shooting and held a moment of silence before they took the field against the Minnesota Twins.

Other teams that posted statements of support include, in part:

  • MLB’s Chicago Cubs: “We are heartbroken and grief-stricken at the senseless violence in Highland Park.”
  • NBA’s Chicago Bulls: “This situation is one that we’ve been in too many times, saying what feels like the same words and expressing the same sentiments. The Chicago Bulls are committed to change and using the resources in our power to make a difference and help solve this epidemic of gun violence.”
  • WNBA’s Chicago Sky: “We stand with all victims of gun violence across the country, and will do everything we can to ensure a safer future for all of us.”
  • NWSL’s Chicago Red Stars: “We stand with all victims of gun violence, including the many other Chicagoans suffering from gun violence this Independence Day weekend … We urge our leaders and elected officials to act with the urgency and bravery required to protect our friends and neighbors and stop these killings.”
  • MLS’ Chicago Fire: “There is no place for gun violence in our community or our country. Our hearts are with the victims and families of today’s tragedy and with all those impacted by gun violence every day. Enough is enough.”
  • NFL’s Chicago Bears: “The Chicago Bears mourn the loss of innocent lives in today’s senseless and disgraceful mass shooting in Highland Park and extend our thoughts and prayers to its community and all those impacted by the horrific act of violence. We would like to acknowledge the selfless acts from first responders and many citizens to help all in times of dire need.”
  • NHL’s Chicago Blackhawks: “Everyone deserves to feel safe where they live, work and play, and this simply cannot be accepted as commonplace. We love you, Highland Park.”

CNN’s Jill Martin and David Close contributed to this post.

13-year-old had active shooter training and "hit the ground sobbing," relative says

From CNN's Jason Hanna, Adrienne Broaddus, Eric Levenson and Susannah Cullinane

Steve Tilken told CNN he sheltered in a store basem*nt with his wife, her two grandchildren and dozens of others as police scoured the area for the gunman during Monday’s shooting.

The Highland Park resident told CNN he initially thought someone was letting off a series of fireworks, but his wife’s 13 year-old granddaughter had undergone active shooter training at school and “all of a sudden hit the ground sobbing.” She also brought her brother to the ground, Tilken said.

Tilken said they ran into the nearby store when he realized they were unprotected and in the line of fire.

Around 20 people were sheltering in different areas of the basem*nt, including two women who appeared to have minor injuries from bullet grazes, Tilken said.

He said he went out of the store at one stage to try to see what was happening and saw a body “in a pool of blood,” about eight feet from where he was standing.

Police carrying assault weapons later entered the basem*nt looking for the shooter, Tilken said, and then brought a doctor to assess those with injuries.

Read more about what witnesses encountered here:

Law enforcement officers investigate the scene of a mass shooting at a 4th of July celebration and parade in Highland Park, Illinois, USA, 04 July 2022. A gunman opened fire as people gathered to watch a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, killing at least six people and injuring dozens.Highland Park, Illinois, USA 4th of July parade shooting - 04 Jul 2022 Tannen Maury/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock Related article 'People just falling and falling': Witnesses describe terror at Illinois parade shooting

Sounds of gunfire were originally thought to be fireworks, some bystanders said

From CNN's Helen Regan and Adrienne Broaddus

A day of national celebration turned to tragedy Monday when a gunman killed six people and injured dozens of others at a July Fourth parade in Highland Park, Illinois – leaving the nation grieving yet another mass shooting.

Bystanders initially thought the sound of gunfire that pierced the sunny parade just after 10 a.m. CT along the town’s Central Avenue, about 25 miles north of Chicago, was fireworks, until hundreds of attendees started to flee in terror – abandoning strollers, chairs and American-flag paraphernalia strewn on the streets.

Eyewitnesses described grabbing their children and families and running for their lives, some hiding behind dumpsters or in nearby stores for safety amid the chaos. One parade-goer described seeing a girl shot and killed, another saw a man shot in the ear with blood all over his face.

“It looked like a battle zone, and it’s disgusting. It’s really disgusting,” Zoe Pawelczak, who attended the Independence Day parade with her father, said.

Read more about what happened at the parade here:

HIGHLAND PARK, IL - JULY 04: First responders work the scene of a shooting at a Fourth of July parade on July 4, 2022 in Highland Park, Illinois. Reports indicate at least five people were killed and 19 injured in the mass shooting. (Photo by Jim Vondruska/Getty Images) Jim Vondruska/Getty Images Related article July Fourth celebrations in Highland Park, Illinois, end in terror after mass shooting leaves 6 dead and dozens injured | CNN

Victims transported to an area hospital ranged in age from 8 to 85, doctor says

From CNN's Chuck Johnston, Brynn Gingras and Joe Sutton

Six people were killed Monday after a gunman opened fire at a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, authorities said.

Five of those who were killed died at the scene, all of whom were adults, said Lake County Coroner Jennifer Banek. Another person died after they were transported to a local hospital, she said. Authorities are working to notify the victims’ families and have not publicly identified those who were killed.

A total of 26 patients were received at Highland Park Hospital, according to Dr. Brigham Temple, medical director of NorthShore University Health System. Of those tended to at that location, 25 sustained gunshot wounds, Temple said. Ten of those treated arrived by ambulance, he said, and 19 of the 25 gunshot victims have been discharged.

The patients there ranged in age from 8 years old to 85 years old, according to Temple, and four or five of the patients were children.

Five others were transported to Evanston Hospital, according to spokesperson Jim Anthony with the NorthShore University Health System.

Bidens "shocked" by Highland Park shooting as White House marks July Fourth

From CNN's Betsy Klein, Donald Judd and Maegan Vazquez
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (45)

US President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden take a moment of silence for the victims of the Highland Park shooting during a Fourth of July BBQ at the White House in Washington, DC, on Monday.

President Joe Biden began Independence Day by sharing a message that looked to the country’s future, but quickly had to respond to another mass shooting in the United States.

Biden noted that he had “surged Federal law enforcement to assist in the urgent search for the shooter,” and pointed to the gun safety legislation he recently signed into law.

Read more about Biden’s reaction here.

Here's what we know about the suspect taken into custody in connection with the shooting

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (46)

The person of interest in Highland Park mass shooting is 22-year-old Robert E. Crimo III.

Robert E. Crimo III, identified by police as the person suspected of shooting and killing six people and wounding dozens of others Monday morning at a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, has been arrested, authorities said Monday evening.

Police believe the suspected gunman opened fire shortly after 10 a.m. CT from the rooftop of a business near the parade route. The gun was a “high-powered rifle” and the attack appeared to be “random” and “intentional,” said Christopher Covelli, spokesperson for the Lake County Major Crime Task Force.

Here’s what we know about the suspected gunman:

  • Suspect was apprehended hours after shooting: Federal, state and local authorities identified Crimo on Monday after the shooting and asked for the public’s help in locating him, saying he was believed to be driving a 2010 silver Honda Fit. Crimo was spotted by a North Chicago officer who attempted to initiate a traffic stop, and he then fled and led officers on a brief pursuit before being stopped in Lake Forest, Illinois, authorities said late Monday. He was taken into custody without incident, police said. In video taken by a bystander, police can be heard giving commands for Crimo to get out of the vehicle. Police with guns drawn are seen as Crimo exits the vehicle with his hands in the air.
  • Suspect posted violent imagery online: The suspected gunman posted online music videos he apparently made that featured ominous sounding lyrics and animated scenes of gun violence. One video shows a cartoon animation of a stick-figure shooter – resembling Crimo’s appearance – in tactical gear carrying out an attack with a rifle.In another video, a similar stick-figure cartoon character resembling Crimo is depictedlyingface down on the floor in a pool of his own blood surrounded bypolice officers with their guns drawn. The Facebook and Twitter accounts believed to belong to Crimo were taken down after he was named by authorities as a person of interest.
  • Digital evidence helped investigators determine suspect: Law enforcement officials have “processed a significant amount of digital evidence today which helped lead investigators” toward identifying Crimo as a suspect, Covelli said late Monday. Police labeled Crimo “a person of interest” during their manhunt after the shooting, which Covelli said, “calling somebody a suspect or person of interest, it’s really synonymous … This individual is believed to have been responsible for what happened and the investigation will continue.Charges have not been approved yet at this time – and we are a long way from that.” Highland Park Police identified the suspect as being 22 years old, but a later FBI bulletin reported he was 21. CNN has reached out to authorities for more information.
  • Suspect’s uncle saw no warning signs, he says: An uncle of the suspect told CNN he saw no warning signs that would prompt him to believe his nephew would have been involved in such a tragedy. “I’m heartbroken. I’m so heartbroken,” Paul A. Crimo said, expressing remorse for the families of the victims and adding he spoke at length to law enforcement Monday about his nephew. The suspect lives in an apartment behind the house owned by his father, Paul said, adding that he last saw his nephew Sunday evening looking at his computer and not acting out of the ordinary.

Analysis: July 4 parade slaughter again shows nowhere is safe from America's mass killing contagion

Analysis from CNN's Stephen Collinson
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (47)

A man carries his belongings after a mass shooting at the Highland Park Fourth of July parade in downtown Highland Park, Illinois, on Monday.

America’s latest mass shooting turned a cherished July Fourth parade from a scene of patriotic joy into one of fear and death.

The rapid bursts of a high-powered rifle brought the chilling reality that no one can be sure they are safe, anywhere, to one of the nation’s most unifying gatherings.

In that instant, Highland Park joined Uvalde, Columbine, Newtown and Parkland and a long list of cities and towns known across the country for the massacre of innocents in a gun violence contagion that makes the United States an outlier in developed societies.

Television pictures Monday of police vehicles in Highland Park rushing to help beneath a billowing American flag added an ironic, new dimension to this latest horror. It took place as Americans gathered to celebrate the 246th anniversary of the freedoms inherent in American independence.

Yet what unfolded encapsulated the quintessentially American cycle of death by firearms. When a gunman killed three people in a mall shooting in Copenhagen, Denmark, over the weekend, it was shocking because it was unusual. But while Monday’s shooting outside Chicago was unexpected, another mass shooting in the US was hardly a surprise.

Read the full analysis here:

A man carries his belongings after a mass shooting at the Highland Park Fourth of July parade in downtown Highland Park, Ill., a Chicago suburb on Monday, July 4, 2022. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh) Nam Y. Huh/AP Related article Analysis: July 4 parade slaughter again shows nowhere is safe from America's mass killing contagion

Gun Violence Archive: Over the past 186 days, there have been more than 300 mass shootings in the US

From CNN's Travis Caldwell

The shooting deaths of six people at a parade in Illinois was one of several mass shootings over the Fourth of July holiday weekend in the US, according to data compiled by the Gun Violence Archive, a nonprofit that tracks gun violence incidents across the country.

As of July 5, there have been at least 311 mass shootings since the beginning of the year, according to the archive. July 5 is the 186th day of 2022.

The Gun Violence Archive, like CNN, defines a mass shooting as one in which at least four people are shot, excluding the shooter.

Last year was the worst year on record since the Gun Violence Archive began tracking mass shootings in 2014. There were a total of 692 mass shootings in the US in 2021, the nonprofit says.

Here are the latest developments in the Illinois Fourth of July parade shooting

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (49)

An aerial photo shows law enforcement officers investigating the scene at the Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, on Monday.

At least six people were killed in a mass shooting at a July Fourth parade in Highland Park, Illinois, located about 25 miles north of Chicago.

A suspect, identified by police as Robert E. Crimo III, has been arrested after being spotted driving following the shooting and led police on a brief chase, authorities said.

Here are the latest developments:

  • Video shows officers taking suspect into custody: Ryan Lerman, a delivery driver, told CNN he had been following the news and noticed right away a Honda Fit that Crimo was suspected of driving, capturing the moments of his arrest on video. “He was there for a minute and then like seven cop cars showed up,” Lerman said. In the video, police can be heard giving commands for Crimo to get out of the vehicle. Police with guns drawn are seen as Crimo exits the vehicle with his hands in the air.
  • Digital evidence helped investigators determine suspect: When authorities discussed the apprehension of Crimo during an evening news conference, Lake County Major Crime Task Force spokesperson Christopher Covelli said law enforcement officials have “processed a significant amount of digital evidence today which helped lead investigators” toward identifying Crimo has a suspect. Earlier, as law enforcement searched for Crimo, police labeled him “a person of interest,” which Covelli said, “calling somebody a suspect or person of interest, it’s really synonymous … This individual is believed to have been responsible for what happened and the investigation will continue.Charges have not been approved yet at this time – and we are a long way from that.”
  • People wounded range in age from 8 to 85, doctor says: A total of 26 patients were received at Highland Park Hospital, 25 of whom sustained gunshot wounds, according to Dr. Brigham Temple, medical director of NorthShore University Health System. The patients range in age from 8 to 85 years old, according to Temple, and 19 of the 25 gunshot victims were treated and have been discharged. Four or five of the patients were children, Temple said.
  • Officials pledge support for community: Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzkerand Sen. Tammy Duckworth said Monday they will ensure federal and state support goes to those affected by the shooting. “It is devastating that acelebration of America wasripped apart by our uniquelyAmerican plague,” Pritzker said. “A day dedicated to freedom hasput into stark relief theone freedom we, as a nation,refused to uphold.The freedom of our fellowcitizens to live without thedaily fear of gun violence.” Duckworth said she’s been in touch with President Joe Biden and Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas, who she said have both pledged to send resources that are needed.

6 people were killed in a mass shooting at a Fourth of July parade in Illinois. Here's what we know

July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (50)

First responders work the scene of a shooting at a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, on Monday.

At least six people were killed and more than 20 were wounded in a shooting at a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois. It marks at least the 308th mass shooting in the US this year, according to data compiled by theGun Violence Archive, a nonprofit tracking such incidents.

A suspect, identified by police as Robert E. Crimo III, has been arrested after a manhunt and brief chase from police ended without further incident, authorities said.

Here’s what we know so far about the shooting:

  • Where it happened: Highland Park, Illinois, is located about 25 miles north of downtown Chicago. Police say the shooting started about 20 minutes from the start of the parade.
  • The shooting: Sgt. ChristopherCovelli, from the Lake County Major Crime Task Force, said police have recovered a “high-powered rifle” on the rooftop of a business. Police say they believe the shooter was on the rooftop when he opened fire. Covelli said the suspect likely accessed the roof from a ladder in an alley. Officials have not disclosed where the building is specifically. A firearm that was recovered in Highland Park after the shooting is being urgently traced to figure out who purchased the weapon and where it came from, according to Kim Nerheim, spokesperson with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.
  • The victims: Five of the people that were killed during the shooting died at the scene, Jennifer Banek, the Lake County coroner, said. All of those people were adults, she said. Another person died after they were transported to a local hospital, she added. Covelli said that it appeared that spectators and parade participants were targeted. Dr. Brigham Temple, of the NorthShore University Health System, said 26 people in total were brought to the hospital and 25 had gunshot injuries. At least 19 people were treated and discharged home. The victims age ranged from 8 to 85 years old, Temple added.
  • Witnesses: Several people who attended the parade told CNN they thought the gunshots were fireworks at first. Zoe Pawelczak said when she realized something was wrong, she grabbed her dad and started running. Others described the scene as chaotic as people ran away and took shelter.
  • The suspected shooter: The gunman was not apprehended at the scene, and authorities later named Robert E. Crimo III as a person of interest. Crimo was spotted in his vehicle by a North Chicago officer, then fled and led officers on a brief pursuit before being stopped. He was taken into custody without incident and will be taken to the Highland Park Police Department. Earlier, Highland Park Police identified the suspect as being 22 years old, but a later FBI bulletin reported he was 21. CNN has reached out to authorities for more information.

Shooting suspect posted violent imagery

From CNN's Jeff Winter, Yahya Abou-Ghazala and David Williams

Suspected gunman Robert “Bobby” CrimoIII posted online music videos he apparently made that featured ominous sounding lyrics and animated scenes of gun violence.

In one videotitled “Are you Awake,” Crimo is seen with multicolored hair and face tattoos and is narrating, “I need to just do it. It is my destiny.”

The video shows a cartoon animation of a stick-figure man – who resembles Crimo – in tactical gear carrying out an attack with a rifle.

In another videotitled “Toy Soldier,” a similar stick-figure cartoon character resembling Crimo is depictedlyingface down on the floor in a pool of his own blood, surrounded bypolice officers with their guns drawn.

Crimo, who calls himself “Awake the Rapper,” posted his music on several major streaming outlets and on a personal website. The Facebook and Twitter accounts believed to belong to Crimo were taken down after he was named as a person of interest in the mass shooting that killed at least six people. His Facebook profile photo showed him wearing a helmet with a camera mount, a face cover and a multicolored jacket.

On September 24, he posted a video on Twitter that shows him sitting on a set resembling a classroom, wearing a helmet and posing in various scenes while an instrumental arrangement of “When Johnny Comes Marching Home” plays in the background.

He had not posted on Twitter since October 26, 2021, when he wrote, “I am not a robot.”

In yet anothermusic video for asong titled“On My Mind,”Crimoperforms in a classroom set filled with desks, lockers and chalkboards. In the last minute of thevideo,theviewersseea shot ofCrimoreaching into his backpack before the music abruptly cuts. Then,Crimois seen wearing a helmet and a tactical vest, dropping bullets onto the floor of the classroom, with the music from a popular shooting video game,“Call of Duty,” playing over the scene.

The videos appear to have been posted online last year.

"It was sickening": Highland Park residents describe scene at parade

From CNN's Jason Hanna, Adrienne Broaddus, Eric Levenson and Susannah Cullinane

Miles Zaremski, a Highland Park, Illinois, resident, told CNN he was walking to the Fourth of July parade when he heard a “pop” and thought that maybe a car backfired.

“And then there were multiple pops,” he told CNN’s Katilan Collins. “I’d say I heard maybe, and I’m guessing, about 30 pops. There was a pause in between, a set of pops, and then a second set of pops. And then the crowd that was on either side of [Central Ave.] started rushing, a stampede like, going west, which is against me,” he explained.

Jeff Leon, 57, told CNN on Mondayhe heard what he believes were gunshots ring out minutes into the start of the parade.

Leon said the shot sounded like “firecrackers in a garbage can,” and it wasn’t until he saw police officers reacting, that he knew anything had happened.

Zoe Pawelczak said many parade-goers initially thought the array of pops were fireworks given the occasion.

Pawelczak and her father hid behind a dumpster for about an hour until police moved them into a sporting goods store, she said, and then eventually escorted them back to their car. She saw one person who had been shot in the ear and had blood all over his face, and another girl who was shot in the leg, she said.

“It looked like a battle zone, and it’s disgusting. It’s really disgusting,” she said.

Read more about what witnesses saw here:

Law enforcement officers investigate the scene of a mass shooting at a 4th of July celebration and parade in Highland Park, Illinois, USA, 04 July 2022. A gunman opened fire as people gathered to watch a Fourth of July parade in Highland Park, Illinois, killing at least six people and injuring dozens.Highland Park, Illinois, USA 4th of July parade shooting - 04 Jul 2022 Tannen Maury/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock Related article 'People just falling and falling': Witnesses describe terror at Illinois parade shooting

CNN’s Shawn Nottingham, Brynn Gingras, Sarah Moon and Dakin Andone contributed to this post.

Illinois senator touts new gun legislation, says more needs to be done

From CNN's Jamiel Lynch

Monday’s deadly shooting was an American tragedy, Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin said during a visit to Highland Park.

“What happened at the parade and all the poor victims and those who were killed in the process breaks my heart,” he said.

Durbin, the Senate majoritywhip, touted the recently passed bipartisan gun bill as an important step, but said there are things it didn’t address.

“There is no reason for a person to own a military assault weapon. It has no value for hunting, or sports or even self-defense,” he said. “It is a killing machine.”

He said he was on vacation and drove seven hours to get to Highland Park as soon as he heard about the shooting.

The senator said it was a day people will remember for a long time.

After praising the efforts of first responders, Durbin said: “It was the best of America with those (emergency responders) that I just described, it was the worst of America that a man took a rifle – a high velocity rifle – and turned it on innocent people and ruined lives and ruined many families in many ways.”

Durbin also urged people to vote in elections.

“If you’re sick and tired of that and think that’s not what America should be all about, elect people who feel like you do,” he said.

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Suspect in connection with a mass shooting at July 4th parade in Highland Park, Illinois, has been taken into custody
A former preschool teacher and a beloved grandfather are among the victims of a deadly July Fourth parade shooting
Police identify 6 of 7 victims in Highland Park parade shooting
‘Those are wartime injuries’: Doctor describes the horrific scene at the Highland Park shooting
‘People just falling and falling’: Witnesses describe terror at Illinois parade shooting
Bidens ‘shocked’ by Highland Park shooting as White House prepares to mark July Fourth

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Read More

What we know about the Highland Park shooting
Suspect in connection with a mass shooting at July 4th parade in Highland Park, Illinois, has been taken into custody
A former preschool teacher and a beloved grandfather are among the victims of a deadly July Fourth parade shooting
Police identify 6 of 7 victims in Highland Park parade shooting
‘Those are wartime injuries’: Doctor describes the horrific scene at the Highland Park shooting
‘People just falling and falling’: Witnesses describe terror at Illinois parade shooting
Bidens ‘shocked’ by Highland Park shooting as White House prepares to mark July Fourth
July 5, 2022 Highland Park, Illinois, parade shooting news | CNN (2024)

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